• Emily Abe

I Walked Away from an $80k Job

Updated: Sep 21

This post is based on experiences I've had. Some details were adjusted to keep things general, more relatable, and somewhat confidential.


I had been been looking for an ideal full-time job for a year. Not an Amazon or grocery store job, but something that matches my design degree and past experience. As a devout Catholic, I've been patient, trusting in God's plan. I've also been determined, motivated by the power I have to influence the direction her life. However overall, I was exhausted from the search and would have liked to get some income again.


You can imagine how excited I was to get an offer for a job at Company A. Not just any job... A job that fits my desired criteria and pays more than any job I've gotten before. I had been earning a $60k salary at Company B and Company A was offering me $80k! It would be a great opportunity to get some training with the latest applications and design techniques too. It seemed like the perfect opportunity!


However, after taking another look at the job, some questions come up. Checking out specific ongoing projects with the company, it seems that they don't exactly do the most wholesome projects. Some that even endorse things contrary to my values as a devout Catholic.


So here's the big question of this post... What should anyone do when they are offered/working at a job and are tasked with doing things that are contrary to Catholic values? Or anyone's values for that matter?



Know Thyself


Well, first of all, it all begins with knowing yourself. What do you value? What kind of culture do you want in a company? Are you looking for a company that has a volunteer program? Write it down.



Know The Company


Next is getting to know a company. Do your research! Peruse their website. Who are their clients? Do you have any connections who work there you can chat with? Go to the interview with values specific questions. The interviewing process is not just for the company to get to know you. One of the things you need to find out is if the company is a good fit for you. If it's not a good fit, walk away, even if it pays $100k/year. No amount of money is worth your conscience, happiness, and soul.


I'd totally recommend finding and researching your dream companies. Then, networking into the department you'd like to work for before they post a job you want. Imagine how good you'll look to a company if you're already acquainted with them?



But I'm Already in a Job?


If you're already in a job and are asked to do something questionable, it's a really sticky situation. Unfortunately, I've been in this kind of situation. When I was asked to make an ad contrary to my faith at my job at Company C, I did it. Here's why: I didn't make it clear upon originally accepting the job that creating certain designs would be an issue. I knew I wouldn't be at Company C for much longer so I didn't make a big deal about it. However, I made sure to remember that in my next confession...


If your values have changed, then perhaps you need to make a job or career change. Things change and that's okay. That's how life works.



This is all said without mentioning those who need to take a job ASAP to have income to support themselves and their family. This is complicated. For now, I'll say, "Pray about it and trust God."


Do you have thoughts about this? I want to hear your thoughts in the comments.



It's really tough to walk away from a phenomenal opportunity, but what's tougher is losing your soul to it. Remember, the length of this life doesn't compare to the length of the next, but the actions of this life influence where you will spend it. So no action to ensure your salvation is too extreme. We cannot serve both God and money.

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“Society needs artists, just as it needs scientists, technicians, workers, professional people, witnesses of the faith, teachers, fathers and mothers, who ensure the growth of the person and the development of the community by means of that supreme art form which is 'the art of education'.”

St. John Paul II's Letter to Artists

emilyabedesign@gmail.com

Minneapolis, MN

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